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Fixing Feet PLLC

Q
What kinds of foot problems are common for people with diabetes?

A

Diabetics can suffer from a variety of common foot problems, but the difference is that for them, those foot problems can turn into serious issues. The common foot conditions can become more problematic because of two issues that are known to affect diabetic feet.

  1. Diabetic neuropathy. If you do not have control over your diabetes and you have too much glucose in your blood for an extended period of time, nerve damage is highly possible. If you damage the nerves in your feet and legs, you're not going to feel much of anything. Some people think it would be nice not to feel pain, but when you don't feel pain, you don't know when you're hurt. Too many diabetics will injure their feet, whether it's by wearing ill-fitting shoes or cutting their foot while they walk around barefoot. Unfortunately, they have no idea that they hurt themselves and if it goes unnoticed for too long, the wound can become infected. Serious infections or tissue death may beyond medical repair, requiring an amputation to save the patient’s life.
  2. Peripheral vascular disease. This is a circulation disorder that affects blood vessels away from the heart; its signature is poor circulation in the arms and legs. Fatty deposits build up in the inner linings of the artery walls of the legs and hinder blood flow. When diabetics have poor blood flow, any wounds or injuries they have on their feet will have trouble healing. Even when a person finds the injury quickly and takes the appropriate steps to have it treated, the process can be very slow.

If you have diabetes, make sure you monitor your glucose levels and manage your condition appropriately. If you'd like to schedule an appointment with an experienced Arizona podiatrist, call Fixing Feet Institute at 623-584-5556 or e-mail us at [email protected].

Dr. Peyman A. Elison
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Founder and Managing Partner of Fixing Feet Institute