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Fixing Feet PLLC

What to Do About a Detached Nail

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If you’ve ever hiked the H-Trail at Thunderbird Park in nearby Glendale you know the beauty of this wonderful place. You may also know the frustration of a detached nail on your toes. It’s not always the most difficult hikes that cause toenails to bruise and fall off; it can happen from any repetitive motion of your foot against your shoe.

When your toenail becomes detached from your foot it can be from one of two reasons: injury or infection. It’s not just athletes that can injure their nails to the point where they fall off (although it’s quite common among those who are physically active). Anyone can sustain an injury that will result in a detached nail. In the case of infection, it’s often the result of athlete’s foot or toenail fungus. When the nail is about to fall off it may become discolored (brown, black, or green) and painful.

If you notice redness, swelling, or a foul odor you probably have an infection, at which point it’s very important to seek medical attention. You will most likely need to take antibiotics to rid your body of the infection. Laser therapy can be a very beneficial treatment option for people with fungus in their nails.

With an injury, you can usually leave well enough alone and let the nail grow back on its own. However, if you experience bleeding or pain you may want to see a doctor for first aid. In some cases there is only a partial removal of the nail. Your doctor may decide that it’s best to completely remove the nail so that it can grow back and heal nicely.

For more information pertaining to self-care or professional treatment of a detached nail call Dr. Viedra Elison at (623) 584-5556 to schedule an appointment at Fixing Feet Institute in Surprise, AZ.

Category: Skin and Toenail Problems

Labels: detached nail
Dr. Viedra V. Elison
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Founder and Managing Partner of Fixing Feet Institute

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